News distribution options

There are many ways to distribute key information, and a press release is not always the most effective method for sharing events, product news and corporate announcements. By examining the content within a proposed press release, it is possible to decide if the information will make an impact and attract media attention or if it might be better suited for another tactic. There are other effective ways to share this valuable content with your audiences.

The more newsworthy the content, the more likely it belongs in a press release.

Here are a few tips on what makes content newsworthy.

Can you answer more than two of these?

Is it timely?

Timing is of the utmost importance in today’s 24-hour news cycle. Recent events, or events in the making, are likely to lead the news.

Is it relevant?

How relevant is a news story to the audience? A California earthquake is almost always more relevant to a West Coast audience than to an audience on the East.

Can it be simplified?

Stories that can be easily simplified or summarized are likely to be featured more prominently than stories that are convoluted or difficult to understand.

Is the news unexpected?

On the other hand, events like natural disasters, accidents, or crimes are completely unpredictable. These events are also likely to have significant news value.

Is this continuous?

War, elections, protests and strikes require continuing coverage. These events are likely to remain in the news for a long time, although not always as the lead story.

Is it predictable?

Certain events, such as elections, major sporting events and legal decisions, happen on a predictable schedule. As the event draws closer, it typically gains news value.

Does it Involve very important people?

Certain high-profile individuals are considered more newsworthy. If someone throws a shoe at an everyday person, it’s probably not news. If someone throws a shoe at the President of the United States, it will be in the news.

Is your story important, impactful, or consequential?

How many people will the story impact? Issues like climate change have become big news precisely because environmental changes impact the entire planet.

Here are a few tips on what makes content newsworthy.

Can you answer more than two of these?

Is it timely?

Timing is of the utmost importance in today’s 24-hour news cycle. Recent events, or events in the making, are likely to lead the news.

Is it relevant?

 

How relevant is a news story to the audience? A California earthquake is almost always more relevant to a West Coast audience than to an audience on the East.

 

Is the news unexpected?

On the other hand, events like natural disasters, accidents, or crimes are completely unpredictable. These events are also likely to have significant news value.

Can it be simplified?

Stories that can be easily simplified or summarized are likely to be featured more prominently than stories that are convoluted or difficult to understand.

Is this continuous?

War, elections, protests and strikes require continuing coverage. These events are likely to remain in the news for a long time, although not always as the lead story.

Is it predictable?

Certain events, such as elections, major sporting events and legal decisions, happen on a predictable schedule. As the event draws closer, it typically gains news value.

Is your story important, impactful, or consequential?

How many people will the story impact? Issues like climate change have become big news precisely because environmental changes impact the entire planet.

Does it Involve very important people?

Certain high-profile individuals are considered more newsworthy. If someone throws a shoe at an everyday person, it’s probably not news. If someone throws a shoe at the President of the United States, it will be in the news.

Say yes to more than one? You’ve got a press release!

While the suggested content might not be newsworthy enough for a press release, there are many places where it can be shared to reach the appropriate audience or stakeholder.

Targeted Media Pitching

Targeted media pitching by an agency or internal PR team ensures that key reporters and their specific audience receives news stories that are most relevant.

Targeted pitches are conversational and outline the details of a news story and briefly state why it’s interesting to the reporter’s audience.

Finding “angles,” or perspectives, for pitches maximize a reporter’s interest. Examples of pitch angles would be:

Newsjacking
Connecting your brand’s pitch to a timely news event for a stronger angle.

Trending topics
Hook your pitch into a popular topic.

Milestone events
Anniversaries, events and awards, or evergreen holidays like Christmas or Black Friday are easy hooks.

Executive Social Media Post

Executive social media also represent the views of the company, but should reflect the background, experiences, and views of the executive as well. This is a platform for a more personal social media presence still reflective of the company. If possible, executive social media pages should be staffed. Examples would be:

Staff updates

Company-wide updates

Subject matter perspectives Participation in timely moments

Company contributions to the community

Industry relevant content

Company goals

Professional tips and skills

Thought Leadership Piece

Thought leadership pieces include op-eds, or opinion pieces, often written by a subject-matter expert, a person with a unique perspective on an issue, or a regular columnist employed by the outlet.

An op-ed is not a news story that simply describes a situation; it is the author’s opinion on a given subject. Offer specific recommendations – the best opinion pieces have a clear, persuasive and well- argued call to action.

A staggering number of op-eds are submitted to various top tier news outlets around the United States, and the majority are rejected. Those selected consist of unexpected, persuasive, and interesting opinions, typically from an author well versed in the topic.

Impact Stories

Impact stories use a real narrative, featuring actual people and events, to make an emotional connection between the audience and the work done by the company. They are most successful for news that has an emotional tie to the community, features “human-interest,” demonstrates the scale of certain achievements, and is concise. Data heavy news articles wouldn’t shine in an impact story.

Article for Internal Publication

Internal newsletters and publications should feature news that is relevant primarily to the employee and executive base. Some examples of this would be:

Job openings and promotions Anniversaries and milestones

Articles on separate departments or groups

Employee profiles and team spotlights

Recent news articles featuring the company

Business changes

Events

Departmental updates

Recent company contract wins Training opportunities

Competitor news and customer stories

Corporate Social Media Post

Corporate social media posts represent the views of the company. News featured on these platforms should be relevant to the audience, easily understandable to the public, enforce the company’s views, and strengthen corporate messaging. Examples would be:

Company updates and events

Contracts and business wins

Market data

Featured articles

Infographics, photos or videos Industry news

Previews of new products Evergreen content

Sponsored Content

Sponsored content is promotional media that’s paid for by an advertiser, but shared by another brand, influencer, or publisher. It contains useful and relevant information and is a persuasive way to tell a targeted audience more about what the company offers.

Sponsored content organically blends into its source for a more natural look and feel to the reader.

Sponsored content can be formatted as an article, photo, video, social media post, infographic, and more.

Need a press release?

Let’s get the message out.

info@bannerpublicaffairs.com

Say yes to more than one? You’ve got a press release!

While the suggested content might not be newsworthy enough for a press release, there are many places where it can be shared to reach the appropriate audience or stakeholder.

Targeted Media Pitching

Targeted media pitching by an agency or internal PR team ensures that key reporters and their specific audience receives news stories that are most relevant.

Targeted pitches are conversational and outline the details of a news story and briefly state why it’s interesting to the reporter’s audience.

Finding “angles,” or perspectives, for pitches maximize a reporter’s interest. Examples of pitch angles would be:

Newsjacking
Connecting your brand’s pitch to a timely news event for a stronger angle.

Trending topics
Hook your pitch into a popular topic.

Milestone events
Anniversaries, events and awards, or evergreen holidays like Christmas or Black Friday are easy hooks.

Executive Social Media Post

Executive social media also represent the views of the company, but should reflect the background, experiences, and views of the executive as well. This is a platform for a more personal social media presence still reflective of the company. If possible, executive social media pages should be staffed. Examples would be:

Staff updates

Company-wide updates

Subject matter perspectives Participation in timely moments

Company contributions to the community

Industry relevant content

Company goals

Professional tips and skills

Thought Leadership Piece

Thought leadership pieces include op-eds, or opinion pieces, often written by a subject-matter expert, a person with a unique perspective on an issue, or a regular columnist employed by the outlet.

An op-ed is not a news story that simply describes a situation; it is the author’s opinion on a given subject. Offer specific recommendations – the best opinion pieces have a clear, persuasive and well- argued call to action.

A staggering number of op-eds are submitted to various top tier news outlets around the United States, and the majority are rejected. Those selected consist of unexpected, persuasive, and interesting opinions, typically from an author well versed in the topic.

Impact Stories

Impact stories use a real narrative, featuring actual people and events, to make an emotional connection between the audience and the work done by the company. They are most successful for news that has an emotional tie to the community, features “human-interest,” demonstrates the scale of certain achievements, and is concise. Data heavy news articles wouldn’t shine in an impact story.

Article for Internal Publication

Internal newsletters and publications should feature news that is relevant primarily to the employee and executive base. Some examples of this would be:

Job openings and promotions Anniversaries and milestones

Articles on separate departments or groups

Employee profiles and team spotlights

Recent news articles featuring the company

Business changes

Events

Departmental updates

Recent company contract wins Training opportunities

Competitor news and customer stories

Corporate Social Media Post

Corporate social media posts represent the views of the company. News featured on these platforms should be relevant to the audience, easily understandable to the public, enforce the company’s views, and strengthen corporate messaging. Examples would be:

Company updates and events

Contracts and business wins

Market data

Featured articles

Infographics, photos or videos Industry news

Previews of new products Evergreen content

Sponsored Content

Sponsored content is promotional media that’s paid for by an advertiser, but shared by another brand, influencer, or publisher. It contains useful and relevant information and is a persuasive way to tell a targeted audience more about what the company offers.

Sponsored content organically blends into its source for a more natural look and feel to the reader.

Sponsored content can be formatted as an article, photo, video, social media post, infographic, and more.

Need a press release?

Let’s get the message out.

info@bannerpublicaffairs.com

Next Steps

In order to determine initial steps and associated costs, Banner welcomes the opportunity to collaborate with you to make a big impact with your big moment even when there is no “big event.”

Connect with Banner today

Washington DC

202.452.6865
440 First Street NW,
Suite 450

Washington, DC 20001

St. Louis

314.942.5530
8000 Maryland Ave
Clayton, MO 63105

San Francisco

415.203.8444
4 Embarcadero Center
San Francisco, CA 94111

Los Angeles

415.203.8444
555 South Flower Street,
Suite 4400

Los Angeles, CA 90071

Denver

773.234.1776
201 Columbine Street,
Ste. 6618
Denver, CO 80206